Philippines

Islamic Relief was on the ground delivering vital aid in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan, which struck the archipelago late in 2013.

Typhoon Haiyan’s brutal winds pounded parts of south east Asia. Travelling at an incredible 300km an hour when it struck the Philippines, Haiyan was the strongest storm recorded at landfall.

More than 14 million people were affected, with more than 6,000 people losing their lives in the storm and over four million left homeless.

In the immediate aftermath of Haiyan, Islamic Relief did not delay. Working as part of the Disasters Emergency Committee, and with The Organisation of Islamic Cooperation, we distributed 20,199 food parcels, gave out 1,636 tents and 3,000 tarpaulins, supplied 2,000 kits that included tarpaulin, rope, a ground sheet, blankets, mosquito nets, cooking utensils, tools and a plastic tool box, and put up 270 resilient shelters.

A charted aircraft carried our largest ever single consignment of aid to the devastated country.

After the initial emergency phase, we helped communities to take stock, and have been running a series of programmes in the last year to help people get back on their feet and to improve their resilience to future disasters. Our longer-term programme includes providing permanent, disaster-resilient shelters.

In the Philippines, we have supported 15 small businesses, have helped repair 119 fishing boats, have provided fishing equipment to 430 fishermen, and have supported 119 seaweed farmers. We have built toilets, shelters and schools, installed benches and vegetable gardens.

Additionally, we are currently offering training of new skills including basic carpentry, plumbing, masonry and electrics. We hope to soon offer skills training in small engine repair, bread and pastry making and welding.

Our office is located in Cebu and is registered with the Security Exchange Commission.

Projects in Philippines

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